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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know from recent readings on the web that most recommend an aftermarket barrel with normally cut rifling if firing lead bullet reloads in a Glock pistol. My experience was with a very early model 17. After doing the initial review and writing it up, I took it on myself to see how many rounds I could run through it without cleaning at all before either the gun, or I, finally gave up. Over a period of time, I shot up nearly 5000 rounds of my 125gr RNL reloads. Accuracy was acceptable during this period and didn't suffer the more I shot. I used these loads in both practice and matches.

The only hiccup came at just under 3500 rounds when the slide failed to go into battery by a gnat's eyelash. I smacked it home easily and finished the magazine. An inspection of the chamber showed a minute ring of lead had built up around the chamber, just enough to keep the round from seating fully. I flicked it out with a pocket knife and did not have another problem through another 1500 rounds when I finally quit. My progressive press got quite a workout during this time:) .

At this point, I fired one magazine of FMJ rounds prior to cleaning. It had been suggested to me to try this to aid in removing some of the lead that may be present in the stock barrel. The barrel scrubbed clean without any fuss. I would suggest not loading to high velocity with lead. My reloads were kept to around 1000 fps. IMO, this kept the bullets from "skidding" over the polygonal rifling so much, thereby leading the bbl.

I've also read recently that the Glock chamber doesn't support the case as well as an aftermarket one that may be slightly tighter and more supportive on the underside of the case. It was claimed that this leads to case bulging and stress when running through the sizing die. Some of my cases were reloaded a half dozen times, but I had no splitting or case failures during this period. All cases were full length sized in a carbide sizing die and finished off in a taper crimp.

You're results may vary. I'm just offering this for your information.
 

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Very interesting, I am not a reloader but good to know this if 'push came to shove' and all I could find were RNL.
 

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I've also read recently that the Glock chamber doesn't support the case as well as an aftermarket one that may be slightly tighter and more supportive on the underside of the case. It was claimed that this leads to case bulging and stress when running through the sizing die. Some of my cases were reloaded a half dozen times, but I had no splitting or case failures during this period. All cases were full length sized in a carbide sizing die and finished off in a taper crimp.
it can lead to a higher chance of KB's. a tighter chamber means a higher risk of jams with different bullets. I can only assume that it’s a "give"; not shooting reloads for a gun that eats everything
 

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I've also read recently that the Glock chamber doesn't support the case as well as an aftermarket one that may be slightly tighter and more supportive on the underside of the case. It was claimed that this leads to case bulging and stress when running through the sizing die. Some of my cases were reloaded a half dozen times, but I had no splitting or case failures during this period. All cases were full length sized in a carbide sizing die and finished off in a taper crimp.

You're results may vary. I'm just offering this for your information.
" Glock Bulge " is a reality for the 40S&W. I don't know about other calibers. From what I have heard the main danger is in feed issues if using another brand of 40 S&W pistol using cases fired from a Glock. Lee makes a " De-Bulge " die that will return your cases spec. The bulge is low down on the case near the head and standard crimp and resizing dies do not reach far enough down the case. The de bulge die allows the entire case to be rammed through the die. Entering at the bottom and emerging out of the top of the die.

I do this as a part of normal case prep for a 40S&W
1. Clean the case in a wet tumbler.
2. Lube the case.
3. De Cap and re-size the case.
4. De bulge the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
THANKS BRO, YOU JUST SAVED ME A TON OF MONEY IN FMJ's!!!
Just a thought here, but considering all the postings on the web that are contrary to my findings, I would definitely scrub the barrel after every range trip when shooting lead. I also would only purchase a few to try, rather than a few thousand. You also might consider plated bullets rather than FMJ's.
 

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Lee makes a " De-Bulge " die that will return your cases spec. .
I am thinking the cases may need to be aneeled (sp) you know heated to relieve the bend. I would think it can only be bent some many times before there is a crack and KB.
 

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" Glock Bulge " is a reality for the 40S&W. I don't know about other calibers. From what I have heard the main danger is in feed issues if using another brand of 40 S&W pistol using cases fired from a Glock. Lee makes a " De-Bulge " die that will return your cases spec. The bulge is low down on the case near the head and standard crimp and resizing dies do not reach far enough down the case. The de bulge die allows the entire case to be rammed through the die. Entering at the bottom and emerging out of the top of the die.
Glock bulge does exist for the 40s&w. I have a M23-2, I also have a Lone Wolf barrel for it (to shoot all the lead bullets I want without concerns) As long as I shoot the original barrel in the Glock I do not need to use the de-bulge die and every cartridge feeds and fires but has a bulge (see photo). But if I shoot using the LW barrel, after using the Glock shot cases without the de-bulge i get many many failure to go into battery ie the slide stops short of battery by 1/4 inch. but if I shoot the LW reload and shoot in the Glock barrel everything works perfect (see photo). Moral of the story, if you stay with the same barrel manufacturer you probably won't have a problem, hence the confusion.
 

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There are numerous and large chamber mouth rebates throughout Glock's several generations of pistol models. The topic of this thread is complex; and there is no easy answer. Here's a well-done post on this topic: Can I shoot lead bullets in my Glock barrel? - GlockPost See Post #21.

:) OK, here’s what I can tell you: Keep your lead bullet's BHN above 12 and below an upper range of, somewhere between, 18 to 24. Make sure your bullet diameter is no more than .001" over bore diameter, and NOT equal to or below it. Keep the muzzle velocity below (about) 1,100 fps.

THOUSANDS OF GLOCK OWNERS REGULARLY SHOOT LEAD BULLETS IN THEIR GLOCKS.

I have many times! When you're first getting started with lead bullets check your bore frequently for leading. After awhile, and with a little acquired experience, you’ll know what to expect, and for how long you can shoot BEFORE stopping to brush out the barrel. (All of my polygonal bores are coated with Sentry Solutions, ‘Smooth-Kote’ PASSIVATED molybdenum disulfide.) Do these things and I do NOT expect an experienced reloader who's been using cast bullets for a significant amount of time to have any problem at all.

To the best of my knowledge, Glock is one of very few manufacturers of mandrel-formed polygonal barrels that recommends against the use of lead bullets in their hammer-forged barrels; AND, given the broad lack of correct knowledge about this topic among the general shooting public, I'd have to say that Glock, GmbH is (probably) correct in making such a recommendation. For shooter/reloaders who actually know what they're supposed to be doing, though, this subject is moot. ;)
 

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Get a Lewis Lead remover from Brownells and then use it after you shoot lead bullets. Personally, I think shooting 5,000 lead bullets without cleaning the barrel is a bit off the wall. I would have to see the test to believe that there was not a major amount of lead build up in that barrel even at 1000 FPS. And then shooting jacketed bullets on top of it all? Makes no sense to me, because lead is soft and in theory if the barrel is leaded you are putting a bullet down a barrel that is undersized due to the lead which would cause some pressure issues. The Lewis Lead remover is a great tool and allows you to utilize common sense. Clean the barrel after each shooting. Not with jacketed bullets.

And as for some of the other comments...I re-manufacture ammo and have been doing so for over 35 years. A lot of what you read on the web is myth. Recently I did a Glock ammo test using a Wilson Combat barrel and managed to shoot 9 rounds reloaded 20 times at 1265 FPS with a 155 grain Montana Gold JHP. TWENTY TIMES and still the brass is usable. No splits no cracks. I realize the Wilson barrel helped the most because the chamber is so tight that after I shoot a round you can put the brass in a chamber gauge and it slides right in. I don't think the brass would last that long with a Glock barrel.

I have three Wilson Combat barrels on three different Glocks. Two on Glock 22's one that has optical sights and one with fixed sights. And I have one in a Glock 21. I also have two Bar Sto barrels in two Glocks with two more on order. The ones that are installed are in a Glock 21 and a Glock 30. I'm getting a pair for a Glock 20 and a Glock 29. Mainly because with my 10mm loads I find that when it get up to the REAL max there appears a very small smiley face on a few of the brass.

11 grains of Longshot behind a 155 grain JHP breaks 1460 FPS out of the 20. No pressure signs anywhere except very slightly in the ramp area on a piece of brass here and there. I'm convinced the Bar Sto will be able to get me over the 1500 FPS line. Up with Underwood ammo velocity. I've also managed to get some 1400 FPS loads out of a 165 JHP in that pistol. If anyone is interested in my .40 test let me know and I'll post it.

Here are two rounds I loaded to prove that a gun can't blow up if the brass is defective in the main body. It simply can't happen. The CHAMBER is what holds the pressure, the brass holds the powder and bullet. If the brass is not in the chamber it will blow up. Which is an issue with a Glock firing from out of full battery.
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View attachment 2669 View attachment 2670

Glock bulge does exist for the 40s&w.
I've loaded thousands and thousands of rounds that have been fired out of Glock .40's. Most police range brass. If there is no "smiley" face the round always seems to resize just fine with my RCBS carbide die set. If the case is bulged to the point where the die pushes brass down into a obvious bulge that brass goes in the scrap. I'd say that most of the newer Glock 40's MUST have tighter chambers because I rarely come across the situation you are illustrating with your pictures. I use Wilson chamber gauges as well as Dillon. Nothing goes in my Glocks that won't fit a gauge because I do not want the receiver getting blown up due to an out of battery discharge.

Speaking of which, if that one time the JDW174 had left that ring of lead in there, and the weapon had fired, he might not be telling the story quite the same way.
 

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I have been wondering about this problem, I have shot a few lead bullets through my Glock 21 with no issues on accuracy or leading. Thanks for the tip.

David
 

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Interesting thread. I got 4 Glocks all factory. I reload and got into casting last year. It was a bummer when I found out that you can't shoot lead in Glocks but now I'm starting to reconsider.
 

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What I found when attempting to shoot plain lead in a stock Glock barrel is that it depends on the barrel. Glock applies the same finish to the inside of the barrel as they do the outside and depending on how rough the finish is applied has a lot to do with how well that barrel will handle plain lead. Some of my guns will shoot lead without a problem while others foul on the first shot. These are the barrels that will prove dangerous to use with cast lead bullets and the danger becomes increasingly critical as other lead bullets are fired in these barrels. It has been my experience that if you have a stock Glock barrel that will tolerate cast bullets it shows in about 20 rounds. If after about 20 rounds you can see lead deposits forming just ahead of the chamber you had better stop. I also found that with these barrels when they foul rather quickly and they never get any better, the finish used by Glock is harder than the steel the barrel is manufactured from so it does not go away quickly or easily. It would be safer to replace these barrels with an aftermarket version or purchase coated bullets which can be purchased for about .10 each or cheaper in bulk. The cleanest coated bullets I have found is the new Blue Bullets made in Kernersville, NC. I have shot these in the "rough" barrels I have and they leave nothing behind and some barrels were actually cleaner after the shooting session that when I started. I cast for my larger revolver and .45 ACP pistols but with the cost of lead and the used to be free tire weights now having to be purchased I have found the Blue Bullets cheaper and a hell of a lot less trouble. All I am saying here is that each Glock barrel is a rule upon its self, you cannot emphatically imply that all Glock barrels will shoot lead safely. I would not want to see someone get hurt and ruin a gun by thinking so no matter what someone said on the internet. Try it for yourself first and then determine if it is safe. I put a link below to the new Blue Bullet company incase anyone is interested:
The Blue Bullets
 

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Polymer coated lead that's their secret!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just FYI, Bayou Bullets states that their bullets are fine in polygonal rifled barrels. Several people shoot IDPA locally with them and no complaints.
 

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Just FYI, Bayou Bullets states that their bullets are fine in polygonal rifled barrels. Several people shoot IDPA locally with them and no complaints.
Is that the Teflon coated green bullets?
 

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I've shot lead bullets in all my Glock's for years with no problems. I've never had leading in my barrels that couldn't be taken care of with some copper chore boy and a little scrubbing. Lots of shooters get Lone Wolf barrels just so they can shoot lead. HOWEVER, on the Lone Wolf website there is a disclaimer that says shooting other than factory bullets voids their warranty.

My solution for the Glock bulge is an EGW undersized sizing die. These are custom sized dies that remove the Glock bulge. Works great. I'm slowly drifting away from casting. At the current prices of cast and plated bullets, I can buy them as cheap as I can make them.
 
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About 15 years ago our agency bought about 25 Glock Gen 3 Model 21's. As the department's firearms instructor I was also tasked with getting the most bullets for the dollar. We had two police supply companies, one in Mississippi and one in Alabama that we ordered from but of course had to pay freight.

I also had a friend that lived five miles from my office. He had been reloading for several of the local police departments for years. He had a large operation. Four Camdex loading machines with all the auto feed systems. Just over $100,000 in the machines not counting the commercial casting machine.

For years we shot 230 grain RN and 200 grain SWC's without the first issue. No leading problems, deformed, or exploded cases. And they were a whole lot cheaper than the out-of-state guys who only sold FMJ. The really great thing was I could back in his driveway and fill up the trunk and be gone in just a few minutes. They came in 500 round cardboard boxes with 60 rounds in plastic sealed baggies which was how many rounds it took to shoot the course one time. Helped keep his costs down and no boxes and Styrofoam to deal with. He was on state contract and would just send us a bill. Can't tell you how many thousands of rounds we bought from him over the years.

So from experience I can tell you that lead bullets in the 21's don't appear to be a problem.
 

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So is there a consensus on this topic? Shoot lead at your own risk? Just swap the barrel for a Lone Wolf? I make my own lead fishing sinkers so this topic definitely appeals to me. I love making my own stuff and using them, just gives me a bigger since of pride. But if it's to dangerous in the fact tgat there could be devastating results tgen it might not be worth it.
 
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