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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any of you guys have any experience with muskets? I have watched several shows on TV about how they load them, fire them and then reload. I was wondering......it seems when they are packing the powder and the round, it seems to me that there is absolutely no tolerance in the round in relation to the barrel. Looks like they have to push pretty hard to pack the round in. I don't know but it just seems that the round is forced in and is a very tight fit, just seems like it would take quite the blast to launch that round when fired. Ideas??
 

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The tighter the ball and patch is to the powder the more power the ball will have. Early muskets the ball was pretty much laid loose in the barrel and as time went along the ball got smaller and they added rifling. Muzzle loaders use cotton patch (pillow take) to create a seal for more combustion. Later they went to a mini ball and that basically expanded when fired to grab the lands in the barrel and speeded up the loading process
 

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Interesting, I have never had any experience with black powder weapons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The tighter the ball and patch is to the powder the more power the ball will have. Early muskets the ball was pretty much laid loose in the barrel and as time went along the ball got smaller and they added rifling. Muzzle loaders use cotton patch (pillow take) to create a seal for more combustion. Later they went to a mini ball and that basically expanded when fired to grab the lands in the barrel and speeded up the loading process
That helps me understand. Didn't realize they made them with rifling.
 

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Early models were called blunder busters because the loaded them with nails and broken glass so anything in front of then for 30 ft or so was trashed. Black powder is dirty (sulfur, coal, salt peter) and leaves you dirty when you fire them. I have an 1861 replica of an army colt and I enjoy shooting it. Basically you have to use lard or felt patches to stop multi chamber firings. As you can imagine lard is "juicy" but it doesn't matter because after shooting you give them a hot water bath.

Last but not least they are limited; hand guns have been known to bounce off of trees and comeback at you. Hand guns are a close up fighting peace but long guns have a bit more power but with rifling they were quite accurate
 

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I have a Blackpowder "Navy" 36 caliber revolver reproduction that I bought many years ago and never have fired it. It is hanging on my wall.

Wow, 1000 Post I made Warrant.!
 

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That's one area I haven't ventured into, other than shooting a friends black powder rifle...I like rounds that move more around the 3,000 fps range...Looks fun, though...
 
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