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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im new to guns and went to the gun range with my cousins husband. I shot his Glock 43 and 17. Wasn’t a fan of the 43 because of the small grip. The 17 was pretty good.
I was interested in buying a Glock but I’ve recently run into a bunch of videos where they mention a lot of gun owners are returning flocks and going for other guns.
Obviously I don’t have much reference but the Glock 17 seemed pretty good. I’m curious why a lot of people are returning their glocks.
 

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I have heard of no LE agencies returning their Glock's or of any Special Forces returning them.

I can certainly say I know no one that is or has returned theirs !

YouTube is not always a good place to gather Intel.
 

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I haven’t heard that myself, my sister has a Glock 43 sub compact 9 mm, and my nephew has a Glock 22 .40 S&W. I have fired both of them, and they have been flawless.

You can get a lot of mis-guided advice while you are watching YouTube.
Or reading someone’s opinions about guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have no clue. But basically in the YouTube videos, the gun store owners were saying flocks were the most returned guns. Not sure if it was because new gun owners were afraid of the safeties or other reasons. I agree that flocks are very reliable and it’s what plenty of agencies use. I was just curious because I’m a normal civilian myself and wondering what other people’s reason was for returning them.
 

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I’m not being funny here, but Glocks are probably the most retained guns too, because they may be the best selling gun in America.

Army Special Forces uses the Glock, instead of the SIG, because they like them. And that’s about what it comes to, its what the unit likes.
 

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I did see a video from a large gun store where they talked about the most returned gun of the year. Glock was the most returned 2 years in a row with the AR15 overtaking that title last.

They said almost all the Glock returns were people stating it was their first gun and they purchased without having any training. They couldn’t get comfortable with the safety system as they didn’t know anything about handling a gun.

In the AR15s, they said people bought them and then realized they didn’t have somewhere to shoot - urban or suburban with limited opportunities to shoot a rifle.


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I've rarely heard of Glocks being returned, as they are the most popular guns and have become popular because of their convenience, not the number of returns.

The best way to understand why someone returns his Glock is to buy the model you like and, after a while, figure out why you are unsatisfied with it... and it does not suit you to the extent that you want to return it and buy another gun.
 

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I did see a video from a large gun store where they talked about the most returned gun of the year. Glock was the most returned 2 years in a row with the AR15 overtaking that title last.

They said almost all the Glock returns were people stating it was their first gun and they purchased without having any training. They couldn’t get comfortable with the safety system as they didn’t know anything about handling a gun.

In the AR15s, they said people bought them and then realized they didn’t have somewhere to shoot - urban or suburban with limited opportunities to shoot a rifle.


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The AR-15 and the Glock are two of the easiest guns to learn to shoot well. My first experiences with the AR-15 (it was an M-16) was a mess, with bad advice on how to aim it. I was trying to remember stock weld, and breath control, etc., with some lousy results. So, I taught myself, and now I’m a good shot with it.

At close range, and inside of a house, the AR-15, can be quick and effective.

By the time that I fired a Glock, it came naturally, and I could shoot it pretty well the first time around.

People seem to think that if they own a gun long enough, they will become proficient with it, without any practice. Proficiency comes with experience and use, but not by osmosis, it takes long term handling and shooting of it.

Note: I have chipped an M-16 hand guard and buttstock, during normal use.
I never had that happen with an M-4. They have better stocks, which are stronger.😊
 

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I bought "Frank" from a LE trade in vendor back in the 1980's.

He was not abused, hell, I bet I have put more ammo though it than the person it was issued to !

I still carry Frank everyday although I do not shoot ever weekend like I used to.

No plans at all of returning him ...


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It took me awhile to get comfortable with carrying a chambered round in a holster, but handling a gun (loaded or unloaded) without using a manual safety was never an issue. Probably from my early years with rifles where I would just open the bolt if I needed to make it safe. An engaged manual safety only meant missing the shot :LOL: I guess by the time I owned a pistol, I knew I could keep objects (fingers or foreign) out of the trigger guard.

Glock was my first pistol (almost 30 years ago). I shot Glocks for a number of years before i ever started carrying a gun.
 

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I have a couple of Glocks and couple of rifles
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It took me awhile to get comfortable with carrying a chambered round in a holster, but handling a gun (loaded or unloaded) without using a manual safety was never an issue. Probably from my early years with rifles where I would just open the bolt if I needed to make it safe. An engaged manual safety only meant missing the shot :LOL: I guess by the time I owned a pistol, I knew I could keep objects (fingers or foreign) out of the trigger guard.

Glock was my first pistol (almost 30 years ago). I shot Glocks for a number of years before i ever started carrying a gun.
Glocks are the only pistol I have ever paid for.
 

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I have a couple of Glocks and couple of rifles
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Not me, I spent money on: a Colt, a S&W, a Dan Wesson and a 3 different Taurus’.
I’m a Glock guy always have been and always will be, old habits are hard to break and when something works, there’s no reason to try and fix it.
Mike
 

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I’m a Glock guy always have been and always will be, old habits are hard to break and when something works, there’s no reason to try and fix it.
Mike
My nephew bought a Glock in 1995 or thereabouts, and my sister (his mother) bought one about 2 years ago. I helped her to pick it out, and then went to the range, and taught her to shoot it.
 

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I have no clue. But basically in the YouTube videos, the gun store owners were saying flocks were the most returned guns. Not sure if it was because new gun owners were afraid of the safeties or other reasons. I agree that flocks are very reliable and it’s what plenty of agencies use. I was just curious because I’m a normal civilian myself and wondering what other people’s reason was for returning them.
I’ve owned Glocks all my adult life, I have a Glock 20, 10mm that’s 30 years old and shoot’s just like it did new. I recently bought a smaller Glock because I’m getting older and the 10mm is a large gun. I every day carry the smaller 43x.
 
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