Glock Forum banner

21 - 38 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
That’s why once a year I wash the action in Dawn soap and warm water. Really slosh it around. Then rise in warm water, blow out with compressed air and use hair dryer on warm (NOT hot) setting to dry. I’ve sometimes flushed out some really strange stuff from sand grit to saw dust and old lint scales.
Regardless of what that lint test showed ...lint in a high humidity and variable temperature environment will freeze an action. (Think lint inside action for 6-9 months, high RH and damp lint, temps from room temperature to -10 degrees. Hmmm, damp lint at zero degrees in the snow...)
Just saying be safe wash out your action yearly...
thumbs up!
Please accept our apologies for not being detailed enough in the initial post. Our initial posting was only concerned with cleaning a completely stripped (and bare) Slide, with regard/focus to its enclosed channels and the parts that reside within those channels; specifically the firing-pin (Striker), Extractor Depressor Plunger (EDP) and associated channels. Factor in we are CDL (otr), there are times when we do not have convenient access to one (1) or more proper tool(s) , or enough time, to perform maintenance on a regular interval. Hence, we may have extra, and possibly hardened (frozen or otherwise) build-up in these channels or crevices thereof. The contents of your above reply tells, us you (PSmith) knows what we're speaking of.

What we were missing from our homemade mobile kit were tube brushes. We were hoping someone within this community (thread) would have discovered or recommended a tool already being employed for the task of cleaning channels and the channel parts. In any case, we are on the right track and have found a few items of interest (tube brushes, [diameter yet to be detemined]), that we will choose from; depending on the bristle material. After all is said and done we will post the resolve with HD images. It's not really rocket science, but, given that performing maintenance on these 'channels' will void Glocks' written warranty, we would rather get it right by the second or third time we venture in to those areas.

Our Plan: On The Road (otr)
- Gloves: protect hand from chemicals
- Gun Scrubber
- Piks & brushes: Tooth and tube brushes
- cloth (lint free)
- CLP: synthetic Lubricant of choice/availability

As PSmith has stated, the symptoms and after affects of dust + moisture, gone unchecked will make a bad situation worse. Sort of like Murphys' Law on Steroids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I use a variety brass picks and still use them with out alot of force they can be shaped to be able to push to the bottom of blind holes and twist around to lossen any debris that is built up in there then use a good spray cleaner followed by some compressed air IE aircompressor. If it is real dirty u can put a solvent in a tube and soak it for a few hours then try cleaning it as described, repete as needed. If you have any other questions or anything you need help with jump over to our website and you can send use an e-mail or call I will do my best to help.
tpsgunsales.com - The Pawn Shop and Gun Sales - Tipton, Iowa, we have great deales on cleaning supplies and guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
I use a variety brass picks and still use them with out alot of force they can be shaped to be able to push to the bottom of blind holes and twist around to lossen any debris that is built up in there then use a good spray cleaner followed by some compressed air IE aircompressor. If it is real dirty u can put a solvent in a tube and soak it for a few hours then try cleaning it as described, repete as needed.
Thanks for your response. Please look closely at the post you replied to. Notice where we stated CDL (otr)? We are on the move. Air Compressor with clean air is not a readily available option, nor is soaking; for any length of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
Hey partner I understand your dilemma, kept my CDL (dropped Haz-Mat when I retired). I was outside (in lower 48) last month and made a run from Everett WA to Buffalo NY and back. Weather closed I-90 twice in MT and WY. Coming back I-80 closed at Laramie and we took Rte 30 by-pass (great road). Little America dinner was great...

Back on topic, I’m lucky and have compress air at home and on my rig. I really have no solution except maybe picking up a quick connect air nozzle at NAPA (couple of bucks). Then when you hit a layover with compressed air ...snap, click and blow out.
I’ll get castrated for this next comment... In really nasty or dirty environments (like OTR) I prefer my DA revolver. The Glock19 is my back-up pistol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
Hey partner I understand your dilemma, kept my CDL (dropped Haz-Mat when I retired). I was outside (in lower 48) last month and made a run from Everett WA to Buffalo NY and back. Weather closed I-90 twice in MT and WY. Coming back I-80 closed at Laramie and we took Rte 30 by-pass (great road). Little America dinner was great...
Lucky you <grin>

Back on topic, I’m lucky and have compress air at home and on my rig. I really have no solution except maybe picking up a quick connect air nozzle at NAPA (couple of bucks). Then when you hit a layover with compressed air ...snap, click and blow out.
We have thought of that, but decided against using the rigs air supply because, said air supply does not resemble anything close to clean. We have witnessed (first hand), drivers inserting anti-freeze, and other available chemicals, into the air line in an effort to unfreeze the brake system because someone, or person's unknown neglected to properly, and in a timely manner, drain the tank(s). While we do appreciate your suggestion, we will just stick with a manual tube-brush (for those 'Channels') while otr --until we return to our shop that is equipped with A/C and a desiccant dryer.

We really don't want to take the chance of contaminating the firearms' Slide Channels with whatever is in the rigs air tanks; that would really be an irritation.

I’ll get castrated for this next comment... In really nasty or dirty environments (like OTR) I prefer my DA revolver. The Glock19 is my back-up pistol.
Um-mm, yeah. You may want to sleep with one eye open after that last statement of yours. Last I checked, Lorena Bobbitt is still an active member of the glockforum.net. <grin>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,518 Posts
we are talking a three inch channel... are we going to get this deep into how to clean it ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
we are talking a three inch channel... are we going to get this deep into how to clean it ?
For us the answer is yes <smile>; whether within the forum or not. I think we are beyond any "how to's" with regard to the topic.There has been a bit of engineering before this device hit the market and Glock is not forth coming with all the required information, via a phone call, or two. This is a healthy discussion, given that Glock advises against it and may void your warranty should the user decide to venture into those areas; with the exception of taking it to an Amorer. For us this is an unacceptable option (Armorer), as these areas under discussion need attention just as the other publicized preventative maintenance points. We are also reading where other people are pulling out or otherwise extracting foreign matter they never knew was in those areas; or never knew so much of it accumulated in those areas. Other than that, we are just commenting (discussing), why someone else's method or suggestion works or does not work for another; with minimal amount of spam.

We will not blindly dump or otherwise shove tools/chemicals in our devices with out some thought and or discussion.

Anyone wanting to use the following images may do so with our blessing, in an effort to help others understand their Gen4 Glock(s) and/or this thread.This next image shows areas we found foreign matter to accumulate within the Sticker/Firing-Pin channel, in addition to all the corners/crevices seen in the image. Click the image to make it larger.
BBB_Annotated.png
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
I agree, the foreign junk that can accumulate in a few short months when exposed to dirty environments is truly amazing. I’ve had Spruce and Fir needles in action more than once.

On the brighter side, folks who carry in a clean office environment and CC in their underwear, only have to worry about pubic hair... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
If you need air to blow out the channels and don't have a compressor use canned air that we use to clean computers. Has long plastic tube you can put all the way to the back of the channel so you clean from inside to out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
If you need air to blow out the channels and don't have a compressor use canned air that we use to clean computers. Has long plastic tube you can put all the way to the back of the channel so you clean from inside to out.
"What's up Doc" <grin> ...

You may have missed some parts of this thread. The concern is the accumulation of foreign matter during an extended period of time when we are unable to both conduct routine maintenance or have access to the proper tools while on the the road (otr). If the foreign unwanted matter has accumulated, then begins to attract moisture in cold weather (ultimately hardening), we doubt that any source of air is going to help dislodge that cocktail as we described. We have come to the conclusion that chemical resistant 'tube-brushes' with some 'Gun Scrubber' (if needed), will dislodge stubborn or semi-hardened/frozen material from the inside of the channels is beneficial. Besides, canned air does not have all that much psi.


We will post the final solution once we have these brushes and their specification; for those who interested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,518 Posts
I was thinking a sand blasting machine with some glass bead and about 4000 psi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Was commenting on the post where someone had loosened the grung at the bottom of the channel and was worried about getting it out and not just packing it down again. They also didn't have a compressed air source available or were worried it would be comtaminated with chemicals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
cleaning the firing pin and extractor pin channels is really fairly easy. there are no blind channels involved when extractor , firing pin block and firing pin are removed. i just run the wood handle q tips through until clean then blow with canned compressed air. you should not use any solvents unless you pull the firing pin liner first. then the whole slide can be cleaned with solvent. if gun is not over oiled there should nothing in these channels except powder residue. i don't think any kind of brush should be put into firing pin channel due to the plastic liner as it could be damaged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
cleaning the firing pin and extractor pin channels is really fairly easy. there are no blind channels involved when extractor , firing pin block and firing pin are removed. i just run the wood handle q tips through until clean then blow with canned compressed air. you should not use any solvents unless you pull the firing pin liner first. then the whole slide can be cleaned with solvent. if gun is not over oiled there should nothing in these channels except powder residue. i don't think any kind of brush should be put into firing pin channel due to the plastic liner as it could be damaged.
Did you read the entire thread? Notice within the very first post, line three (3) or four (4) we stated a "completely stripped Slide"; hence no plastic. In another post we stated we were interested in 'nylon, chemical resistant tube-brushes; not sure what type brushes you are speaking of.

We run some harsh environments where moisture, if not outright water, snow/ice will find its way, and/or form (ice) within the firearm. We only having access to very limited amount of tools (no clean compressed air), can air will not do for debris mixed with moisture than has turned to ice. We don't use Q-tips/cotton swaps in our firearms with or without available A/C. Lastly, little time for maintenance (OTR).

When this thread was started, we were (and still are), hoping for some feedback based on the contents of what 'we' posted; factoring in our travels in and around these harsh environments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
If you're that concerned about it, and feel the need to continuously find an issue with every ones ideas on how to clean those areas, perhaps you should look into some preventative measures instead. Why constantly sit around worrying about your striker channel being dirty? Or whether your extractor plunger has a speck of anything on it? There's no substitute for routine maintenance. However, there is a solution. Whenever you're not out on the road, strip that thing down and clean it till it's as clean as you need it to be with whatever you feel is the right tool/tools to use. You might want to consider doing it in a pressurized room too that way you won't have to worry about any dust particles getting in while your weapon is disassembled. Once your pistol is pristine, pop it into a food saver bag. Vacuum all the air out and seal er up. Don't have to worry about anything getting in there now. Then all you need is something sharp (pocket knife, box cutter, etc) to gain quick access to your weapon. Really hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
You can clean your gun to the point of being microscopic clean in a clean room, but the second it's brought out into normal environment, it's going to start to get dirty.

Glocks are military grade weapons that are made to run when they are dirty in all environments. Minimal cleaning and maintenance.

For detail cleaning the growing trend seems to be a 50/50 mix of simple green and a tooth brush. After cleaning a rinse in hot water. The hot water will evaporate. Use a Q-tip to make sure the firing pin channel is dry, lube in the recommended places with the lube of your choice and reassemble.
 
21 - 38 of 38 Posts
Top