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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to the range yesterday with my G26 and had a very bad experience that I am still almost shaking about. I pulled the gun out of my holster, and I must have had my finger on the trigger and the gun discharged before I had it pointed uprange. Luckily there was nowone else there and no damage was done. I put the gun away and went home. I am afraid to pick the gun up now. I thought I had it ingrained in my head and muscle memory not to touch the trigger untill I had the gun pointed at whatever I was willing to shoot. Not only that, it is a stock Glock 5.5 pound trigger. How did I pull it that hard without even trying? I have to rethink this whole thing now. I have only had a pistol for about four months and maybe at 59, I am losing my edge. I am putting them away for awhile to calm down and think this over. The sad part is that I took the safety course and had a good instructor to boot.
 

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Sorry to hear about your incident and glad no one was hurt. If you are unsure about handling the Glock then you are doing the correct thing by putting it away, especially if you have alredy taken a safety course. I use the Safe T Blok in all my Glocks and the Blocks stay put until I am ready to fire even though I am well versed in keeping my trigger finger out of the guard until ready to fire. I hope you gain your confidence back in the future. Unless you are on some medication that interferes with your judgement, age 59 should not be causing your problem. I am 72 and CCW every day and practice once a month. For a short time the Dr had me on some strong Blood Pressure medicine that made me kind of 'fuzzy" but I had him change it and now all is well.
 

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Things happen to the best of us, man.. Not necessarily time to pack it in...Glad you're ok, and no one was hurt... :)
 

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I put the gun away and went home. I am afraid to pick the gun up now.
When riding a motorcycle one of the things you learn is if you don't get back on it after you dump it or have a wreck; you never will so it is important to get back on and fight that scared feeling. Failure is a great teacher if you let it, the will to do better is what makes us good at doing things. One of the things I like about a laser trainer is I can do hundreds of dry fires and keep muscle memory sharper than not.
the natural way we grip makes it easy to pull the trigger and this is why I am not a fan of pocket carry and that all you did. You got comfortable and made a boo-boo but no one got hurt so that is a plus. so look at the way your gripping the gun and correct it here are two pic's


notice how low the finger in to the trigger guard and some just lay it across the trigger guard, this is too easy for the finger to slip in when you grap the gun
grip1.jpg
This is the right way to grip a gun, trigger finger UP and across the slide and this greatly reduces the chance of failure and the index finger is a natural pointer
grip2.jpg
 

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as like everyone else i'm glad your ok. i was in a shooting booth with a friend one time and he handed me his gun pointed down range and said it wasn't loaded. i pulled the trigger and it went off and i know how that felt and i can imagine how you must feel. i think what might put my mind at ease is to go back to the range with the gun unloaded and research what might of happened. type of clothes, holster, what you were thinking about anything that would give you some idea how this happen. if your lucky enough to find a reason why maybe that would restore your confidence and put your mind at ease.
 

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I'm 68 and have put a LOT of rounds downrange over the years with ONE AD. I was shooting an H&K P7M8...the "squeeze cocker" 9mm. I drew the pistol and let my finger touch the trigger. This was before I had squeezed the cocking lever on the grip. When I did squeeze the lever, the gun went BANG! Evidently, the slight pressure I had on the trigger turned the lever into an oversized DA trigger in itself. The pistol was already pointed at the target, but I still darn near had to change the old underwear on that one. I'm still shooting with no intention of stopping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was probably just getting sloppy and without noticing, put my finger on the trigger. I have to be very careful with that because I have been a boat mechanic for many years, and my fingers are very strong, and because of abuse, they are scarred up and I dont exactly have a light touch when I pick something up. I was taught to put my trigger finger on the slide so if I tripped or slipped, it would not accidently hit the trigger. I guess i will wait a few days untill I calm down and go back to the range and load the gun at the shooting booth and figure out what I was or wasn't thinking. Right now my stomach is still knotted up a bit. I am however not going to CC again untill I can be sure that this is not going to happen again.
 

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good for you shardy! sounds like your already making progress. you know whats best for you and i'm sure you will be fine!
 

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First off, I'm glad to hear nobody was hurt. Secondly, I am still new to the sport of shooting and handling firearms. I have been avidly training and researching for about a year now and I initially had a "voice in the back of my mind" that would remind me that I am NOT a professional nor am I some kind of real life movie start and that my firearms were the real deal. What I found that has worked for ME is that I take steps or intervals in how I carry or handle my glocks. I started out only loading at the shooting table after I had set up in my booth and been ready to fire. From there I took the step to loading mags but not having them in the gun. When I felt comfortable enough out on the farm or at the range I would have a loaded mag in the gun while in the holster but no hot round in the chamber. I still carry my pistol without a round in the chamber until my comfort level and my surroundings are what they need to be. Also, like rowabi stated earlier, accidents can happen to ANYONE and they can be one of the best teaching aids. Glad you're okay and I hope it all works out for you in the end!
 

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Hey Shardy53, Glad you're ok. I'm sure it was a shake up for you but the best thing is to get back in there. Maybe lay the holster aside for a while with live rounds. Keep hitting the range and practice your accuracy and shooting technique. Then while your at home with an EMPTY weapon you can work on your drawing drills. Then slowly reincorporate them back into your live fire drills. The worst thing you can do right now for your muscle memory with only 4 month of shooting is to step back. Use what you learned from the experience and press on, you have a mission to complete
 

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Just use it as a reminder to be more careful in the future. Similar thing happened to me when I was adjusting my grip while holding a .44mag revolver. I had my hand down on the bench with the gun pointing into it, just glad it the bench was wood and not cement. I learned from it and moved on now I'm more careful and if I have to adjust my grip I make sure my finger is away from the trigger.
 

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Glad no one was hurt and you are mindful enough to take a step back. If something like that doesn't make you reevaluate, perhaps you would be better off putting them away for good.

Thank you for posting this. As a new gun owner, I need reminders that it only takes a moment of carelessness for something bad to happen. After I started riding a street motorcycle my dad told me something that this reminds me of, "Just when you get comfortable and lax in paying attention, that is what will cost your life." I hope this incident helps you refocus your years of training and you are back in the saddle soon.
 

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I don't know all the reasons this happened to you, but I know one. It taught me a lesson. It just doesn't hurt now and then to be reminded that these things can really happen. So thanks for being humble and kind enough to share your story with us. And you just might be helped with your confidence by reading my next point. I hope so.

I also want to thank the poster on this thread who replied by also suggesting that we don't necessarily HAVE to carry a round in the chamber when we're out and about, or ever for that matter. That was something that weighed on my mind, always having a round in the chamber. That thought was just abiding uncomfortably in my subconscience as I wait to pass the background check (taking over a week in Colorado). So....I didn't really 'think' did I...I just assumed that was the thing to do. And it didn't sit well with me. Well, thank you poster for posting that, because now I think I can CC more comfortably. If I lose a few seconds to have to chamber a round, well, so be it.

Thank you both for some very meaningful and important posting here.
 
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I don't know all the reasons this happened to you, but I know one. It taught me a lesson. It just doesn't hurt now and then to be reminded that these things can really happen. So thanks for being humble and kind enough to share your story with us. And you just might be helped with your confidence by reading my next point. I hope so.

I also want to thank the poster on this thread who replied by also suggesting that we don't necessarily HAVE to carry a round in the chamber when we're out and about, or ever for that matter. That was something that weighed on my mind, always having a round in the chamber. That thought was just abiding uncomfortably in my subconscience as I wait to pass the background check (taking over a week in Colorado). So....I didn't really 'think' did I...I just assumed that was the thing to do. And it didn't sit well with me. Well, thank you poster for posting that, because now I think I can CC more comfortably. If I lose a few seconds to have to chamber a round, well, so be it.

Thank you both for some very meaningful and important posting here.
First off, to Shardy53 I hope all is well. It's a good feeling to read through some of the responses to your post and see the amount of support and comradery here. Second, to gfmember I believe you were refering to my "empty chamber" comment a while back and I'm glad that brought you some insight into how you plan to approach your carry style. However, it will spark some controversy. I currently don't CC or OC out and about very often. I basically limit myself to in home or in vehicle protection and range days to carry. Alot of people do make a valid point that if the time comes and you NEED your weapon it should be ready to go with minimal steps to stop your target. I don't see the 1 second of time really being a big issue more than the possibility for user error or malfunction. It is a valid point but the bottom line is that YOU should carry or handle YOUR firearms in a manner that YOU feel comfortable with. It all boils down to gun ownership responsibility and mental awareness regardless if your CC, OC, at the range, in your home, or in a fire fight. So in my case, until I'm confident and comfortable in my ability I choose not to carry a gun on my person in public with a round in the chamber.
 

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Yes, duckie, thank you so much for your comment because it really was like a great revelation to me. When reading it I felt like hitting the side of my head and saying, DUH! And I agree, each individual has the ultimate responsibility for his or her own decision about how they'll carry their guns. For me, until I can feel more comfortable walking around with a round in the chamber, I'll just forgo that option and accept any risk my decision might entail. I'll have my gun (G26) in about 9 days and because of you, I feel so much better already!
 

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When I was at the counter of my gun range/shop buying my G-26 someone just coming in was emptying his gun like the rules required and accidentally fired a round fortunately into the floor. Thank God no one was hurt. There were a lot of people around. This was my first gun purchase (hey and I'm 64) and I was really hesitant about it. This incident almost swayed me to walk out without purchasing the gun. I thought that if a presumably experienced gun owner had an accident like that, how could I count on being safe? I did buy the gun and took a holster safety course in addition to the regular CC course.

One day I went down to the "tactical range" so I could draw from my holster. One time when I was reholstering, the Range Safety Office stopped me because my shirt get caught in the holster and could have pressed the trigger back as I slid the gun back into it. I could have hurt myself real bad but learned the lesson the not too hard way.

Maybe you should get the instructor to watch you draw and help you really ingrain the drawer process into your muscle memory. Start again with a very slow drawer thinking through each step piece by piece. Speed will quickly follow good technique.

I'm signing up for additional instruction too.

Forgive yourself for making the mistake that fortunately didn't cause anyone harm and move on.

Sorry for the long-winded post.
 

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Sorry to hear about your incident! Glad nobody was hurt and most of all yourself! Hope you gain your confidence back and get back out to the range!
 

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When i was about 20 (40's now..) I was pinking with a single action 22 pistol. I was in the process of loading it (drop in 22, rotate cylinder with hammer half cocked etc) when my sweaty thumb slipped off the hammer and it went off into the ground near my feet. My hand was cupped around the pistol with my ring finger near the gap between barrel and cylinder. The flash felt like a firecracker going off in my hand leaving my finger stinging with silver flash burn around the knuckle and about 10 tiny fragments of copper embedded in the back side of my finger. I picked out all the copper with a pocket knife while putting some good thought into the mishap. It was a good learning lesson. A few years ago I happened to get a hand xray and they noticed a tiny white dot still there...I guess a permanent reminder.

I agree with the person about not having to have a cartridge loaded while carrying.

Don't be hard on yourself...these things happen. Regardless of the outcome don't let it get you rattled...put some thought into it but don't beat yourself up over it.
 

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Definitely get your gun and head to the range. create your own Safety routine. there is no reason, i can think of, to rack the slide till your ready to shoot. if your taking a break drop the mag. rack the slide to unload then begin again when your once again ready to resume shooting. we are creatures of habit. begin to create safe habits. practice everything holstering unholstering with your gun unloaded till you are smooth and your finger is never inside your triggerguard. gun handling is something that should be practiced as much or more than aim or shooting technique IMHO
 
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