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Looking thru alot of Troubleshooting Forum posts and noticed that most people agreed reloads are a problem - Should reloads be a problem for Glocks . Going thru 500 rounds of factory shot at the range every weekend can be an expensive day. Surely people must use reloads and not have that much trouble ( i am currently having a minor problem with my firearm but i have to find a problem with firearm as i can't use factory loads as the cost will be insane ) This has just been a thought going thru my head
 

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It is not reloads that are a problem with Glocks (as long as they are powerful enough to cycle) it is lead bullets unless you are using an aftermarket barrel because of the rifling in a stock Glock barrel.
 

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It is not reloads that are a problem with Glocks (as long as they are powerful enough to cycle) it is lead bullets unless you are using an aftermarket barrel because of the rifling in a stock Glock barrel.
This. Reloads are fine; one day I hope to know firsthand :)
 

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I reload for all my guns including Glocks, I don't think my gen4's know what factory ammo tastes like ;) I used plated bullets and never had a problem.
 

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+1 on everything above. Reloads are technically ok as long as you don't use unplated/unjacketed lead bullets. I say technically because Glock expressly says reloads void your warranty. If it were allowed, probably even lead would be ok, if it weren't for the polygonal/octagonal rifling of Glock barrels and/or if one were to do an extreme detail cleaning of the barrel after every few rounds of lead ammo - but why take the risk of a squib, warranty nullification or even something potentially dangerous to both you & the firearm.

I usually use Tulammo Russian steel cased ammo in my G34 and other than it being a bit dirty and possibly hard on the extractor, never a problem yet. It is priced low enough to compete with reloads unless you're collecting your brass & casting your own bullets, and also can buy cheap primers & powders locally to avoid hazmat shipping charges...

Cheers

edit: typo
 

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Glock says no reloads so unless you want to forgo any warranty or lie if you have a problem I'd say no reloads. Personally I've put tens of thousands of my own reloads thru various Glocks I've owned. Other than barrel leading that takes longer to clean I've never had a problem. If you really wanted to shoot alot with lead reloads I'd suggest an aftermarket barrel with traditional cut rifling.
 

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I shoot factory reloads all the time. It's the hand loads that may not have the recipe just right to get an under or over powered round that is more the problem.
 

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It's all a matter of personal preference. I'm sure they are fine especially for someone that shoots a LOT! I don't use them at all. I buy quality ammo for personal protection and don't mind the amount of money I have to spend on "range rounds". I always keep 2 boxes of range ammo in my range bag for each caliber firearm that I own. Other than that they all stay loaded with personal protection ammo. Except the .22. I don't even keep it loaded at home, but for someone that likes to go to the range, it is a much less expensive alternative for practicing with. :)
 

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Looking thru alot of Troubleshooting Forum posts and noticed that most people agreed reloads are a problem - Should reloads be a problem for Glocks . Going thru 500 rounds of factory shot at the range every weekend can be an expensive day. Surely people must use reloads and not have that much trouble ( i am currently having a minor problem with my firearm but i have to find a problem with firearm as i can't use factory loads as the cost will be insane ) This has just been a thought going thru my head
Just curious, what kind of problem are you encountering? I'm assuming the problem is with a Glock?
 

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I don't shoot reloads but I have read a lot on the subject and this is what I have found; most KB's are in the 40 cal but have been documented in 10 mm too. not so much in the 9mm and here is why Glock’s have very lose chambers so they can eat different bullet shapes without jamming and stove piping when loading. KB's are caused when the round is not supported at the base near the ramp. Early model Glock 40 cal had big problems and Glock went back and corrected the problem by seating the bullet deeper in the chamber to correct it.

When you shoot a bullet brass flow’s meaning when the bullet is shot the brass heats up and stretches out width and length wise too. When the brass explains it gets thinner every time it shot to the point it will crack and you get case separation. Cases not being supported on the bottom and case wall thinning will blow a hole in the case wall forcing pressure to blown down instead of out.

9mm barrels have a tighter tolerances so KB’s are not as common but Glock still doesn’t approve of them

View attachment 602 this is a breatta barrel but you can see where the case in unsupported at the ramp

this is what happens when the case wall get too thin from to many reloads and you have a KB
edit: before I get hate posts,; this is not the only reason for these. these are also caused by an overcharge or undercharge of gun powder
View attachment 600 View attachment 603
 

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Glock says no reloads so unless you want to forgo any warranty or lie if you have a problem I'd say no reloads. Personally I've put tens of thousands of my own reloads thru various Glocks I've owned. Other than barrel leading that takes longer to clean I've never had a problem. If you really wanted to shoot alot with lead reloads I'd suggest an aftermarket barrel with traditional cut rifling.
What he said...^^^
 
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